Tag Archives: vintage

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FLUEVOG KINGDOM

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Fluevog Kingdom

Not only is Fluevog an excellent design line, they’re also a cool company to work for. My friend Tanaya runs their French Quarter store, and commissioned a dress for their company retreat costume party in Canada this summer. The theme for the party was Moonrise Kingdom, and Tanaya already had the perfect Fluevog saddle shoes for a Suzy look, as well as a designer friend who loves all Wes Anderson movies.

Fluevog saddle shoesRather than taking a cosplay approach to the retro Suzy look I decided to design a dress to compliment the shoes while still fitting into the film’s aesthetic. Why follow someone else’s design when I can make my own?

Fluevog Kingdom What a cutie! Another concern for this design was that the dress be versatile enough to fit into her regular wardrobe. Of course I drafted the simple pattern myself.Fluevog Kingdom dressThe fabrics are all from Joann. The blue polyester has great texture and a little bit of stretch. I layered ivory knit lace over black satin and obviously had fun playing with the pattern layout. The zipper is a vintage metal one from my stash for that authentic touch.

Fluevog Kingdom dress

We didn’t win the costume contest but I’m satisfied that my mission was accomplished!Fluevog Kingdom dressNow that I’ve broken the seal maybe I’ll do better about posting more projects. Happy New Year!

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ZIPPERPALOOZA

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My friends Maria and Patrick of Adorn and Conquer are finally opening their own store in New Orleans! They are also carrying pieces by many artists and makers, including yours truly. The first merchandise order I shipped out was all zipper bags – 27 of them!

zipper bags, made by Julianne

They are almost entirely scrap fabrics, lovingly saved for years. Every bag is lined, most have a loop for attaching a clip or wearing around the wrist.

zipper bags, made by Julianne

You know I’m usually about getting as many different colors onto one piece as possible, but I totally love these all-green bags. They each have both of the above fabrics (one on each side) and even the lining and zippers are green. I hope at least one of them gets used for some stylish stoner’s smoking kit.

zipper bags, made by Julianne

zipper bags, made by Julianne

These embroidered fabrics were saved by my step-sister-in-law Ilaan (who also provided the fabric for my sofa, psychedelic bathrobe, and Miimii dress). They were such tiny scraps! These bags are backed with solid fabrics.

zipper bags, made by Julianne

You’re never too old for a fabulous pencil case! zipper bags, made by Julianne

I totally gasped when I found this amazing blacklight sequin fabric. It’s just too perfect! I look forward to making a few fabulous pieces from this. Any suggestions?

zipper bags, made by Julianne

I made them in so many different shapes and sizes, which was dictated by the individual remnants. They’re each the perfect size for something! I envisioned the smaller bags as the perfect wrapping for a jewelry gift.

zipper bags, made by Julianne

Y’all know how I’m a sucker for projects that use up those wonderful little scraps. On one hand, I try to resist hanging on to “someday could be” materials. Sure, someday it could be used for whatever project I have in mind, but it’s more likely that stuff will just clutter up my life until eventually I get so frustrated that I just want it gone. On the other hand, I love using up every bit of possibility, and some fabrics are too special to let go, not matter how small the pieces are.

I’ll also have turbans and a special new shirt design in the store, but that’s for a special post. Congratulations to Adorn and Conquer on this exciting milestone!

 

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REPLACE Pfaff pedal

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Every once in a while I’d have an issue with my Pfaff 1222E. It usually happened when I was sewing curtains. Heavier fabric, long straight seams, pressing on the control pedal consistently for 10 foot hems. When I took my foot off the pedal the machine would keep sewing! Even more distressing, it would speed up like a little German devil. The only way to stop the madness was to hit the power button.

I’m not the only one who occasionally got a runaway sewing machine. It’s scary, and seemed like an expensive fix. The foot pedal and power outlet are on the same plug, and this part costs $80+ on Ebay! But my wiring was fine, it was just the pedal that was going nuts.

I tried to repair the pedal, but when I opened it up a tiny little resistor cracked and fell off. I confirmed with my electrical-genius friend that this was probably the problem, but we couldn’t really think of an easy way to fix this. The solution seemed to be replacement! (Another solution can be to clean lint out of the pedal, but that wasn’t my problem this time).

Inside the pedal

Inside the pedal

When you press on the pedal, this spring is what's moving.

When you press on the pedal, this spring is what’s moving.

There should be a tiny black bump on the left of the gold piece.

There should be a tiny black bump on the left of the gold piece…

I tried to find the same Pfaff pedal ($80+ online), or at least a white one, but in the end I bought a Singer from the 80s for $15 and just cut off the pedal. Stripped the wires on the Singer and Pfaff pedals, and spliced them together. It works great now! Brian has created a video documenting his process, but it really is as easy as that!

pfaff pedal

Next time we have the soldering iron out I’ll do a proper join of the wires with heat shrink, but for now the electrical tape is working super fine.

A perk of this is that I cut the Pfaff wire near the pedal, and the Singer wire near the plug, so the resulting spliced wire is really long! This means I can run both wires behind my table and still pull the pedal out as far as I want.

If you have any questions about this machine, check out the comments on my earlier post. You can read tips and feedback from people who have used this machine for decades, from people who know a lot more about it than I do, and people who have just acquired one of these machines. And it’s the #2 Google hit when you search the Pfaff 1222e – amazing!

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ANOTHER SHOPPING BAG with pattern

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I promise I don’t post every single one of these! I do enjoy making them though. Bags like these are super easy to make, especially while doing something else. Because gauge doesn’t matter, I can switch between whatever needles or yarns strike my fancy. And they are useful gifts!green knit shopping bag, made by Julianne

This bag uses more chunky acrylic yarn for the bottom, and leftover worsted acrylic for the body. I’m slowly making my way through my stash!

green knit shopping bag, made by JulianneKeep reading for instructions to knit your own.

Continue reading →

I wanted to use a concentric garter stitch for the bottom of the bag, and this is basically how I did it:

CO 6 stitches, placing a marker between each stitch, with a special marker for the beginning of round

row 1: *slip marker, increase 1 stitch, repeat from * (I used kfb, but I think this would look neat with a YO)

row 2: purl all stitches

row 3: *slip marker, work 1 increase, knit to marker, repeat from *

And then you work rounds 2 & 3 until the base is as big as you want.

I continued until I had 12 stitches between each marker, then worked a couple rounds alternating between all purls and all knit stitches without increasing. To conserve yarn when I switched to my worsted, I knit 2 rounds in the contrast color, then worked the third round as k1, k2tog. Round 4 and up was all knit.

Next time I make a bag, I will skip the k1, k2tog row, and just knit all the stitches for the body of the bag (or make the base smaller).

During my last bag, I got burned out on YO, k2tog mesh. Though I like the look, I can never get into a rhythm with that pattern. This time, I knit my worsted weight on size 10.5 (6.5 mm) needles to get an open fabric, and this project was finished in a flash!

The light green top is 4 rounds of garter stitch, and the handles are i-cord.

If anyone uses this pattern for their own bag, I’d love to see the results!

 

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MATMOS DRESS

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Finally able to start unclogging the backlog of posts. Mardi Gras costume will be coming soon!

It’s a simple dress, which means it’s versatile and comfortable and fun to wear.

tie-dye matmos dress, made by Julianne

 I used a vintage pattern that I borrowed from Caroline; I traced the pattern and forgot to copy the name or number! Luckily I haven’t seen her since then, so I actually still have the pattern in a very safe place, so eventually I can find out the relevant information.

tie-dye matmos dress, made by Julianne

Now I’m wearing it with a silk charmeuse slip, and I stay pretty warm. Without the slip, it’s been perfect for warmer days in Los Angeles on the bicycle. The short hem will be fun in the summer!

tie-dye matmos dress, made by Julianne

It’s made from a silky, slinky rayon. I also used the fabric for a dress shirt for my husband (which I will iron and photograph in New Orleans). The print reminds me of the Matmos from one of my favorite movies, Barbarella: Queen of the Galaxy.

tie-dye matmos dress, made by Julianne

matmos 2

I finished the seams in the serger. There’s a black invisible zip, which should be 6″ longer, but I had this size in my stash and I can easily get the dress over my shoulders (but the hips are another story).

tie-dye matmos dress, made by Julianne

I’m not sure about the neckline. Maybe I want to do something bold, like an appliqué or contrasting collar? Maybe I want it lower? For now, it’s bound in matching bias tape. I’d love any suggestions!

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PINK MARKET BAG

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I came across a whole bunch of vintage chunky acrylic yarn at a thrift store, so I’ve been making shopping bags with it. Easy, doesn’t require attention, and makes a useful non-specific gift.

pink knit bag, made by Julianne IMG_5749

Because the yarn is so thick and I used 8mm needles, the bag isn’t very net-like. I know if I were to use bigger needles this project would be faster with more open space, but I really don’t like the feel of big needles in my hand.

IMG_5745I’ve also realized how bored I get with YO, k2tog. I never really get into the rhythm of knitting, so I’ll be exploring other approaches for the rest of the yarn.

IMG_5752

I made it around the same time as I made my mom’s shopping bag.

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